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JuvYou FAQ & Glossary

We are here to partner with you on your wellness journey through recommendations that are personalized for you. To do that you will notice we ask lots of questions. Both the questions and recommendations result in loads of technical terms that paint a picture of your health and empower your journey. We created this FAQ and glossary to help answer your questions as we pave the path to wellness together.

JuvYou FAQs

What is JuvYou?

JuvYou is an innovative platform and mobile application (app) that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to estimate your “JuvBand” age. JuvYou then delivers lifestyle recommendations for positive changes to your nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle. JuvYou allows you to track your progress over time to see how your lifestyle and habits affect your JuvBand age.

JuvYou is not a medical app, as it does not provide medical recommendations, information, diagnosis, or references intended for medical purposes. The JuvYou Mobile App does not provide medical advice and is not meant to treat or prevent disease or replace a visit to your healthcare provider. You should not rely on it solely to make important medical decisions.

What data is incorporated into the JuvYou Mobile App?

JuvYou incorporates data from multiple sources: (i) questionnaire data manually entered by you, (ii) third party data integrated from your apps/wearables where you have opted to integrate these with the JuvYou Mobile App (such as Apple Watch, FitBit, and KetoMojo), and (iii) data from publicly available sources such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) database, which is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States.

Is my data secure with JuvYou?

We take data privacy very seriously. We follow generally accepted industry standards, including the use of administrative, physical, and technical safeguards:

- Your data is encrypted when in transit or on our database so that your data can’t be read by an individual unless they have a decryption key to translate the protected data into something readable.

- We introduced User Authentication and Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) to our database to control what actions a JuvYou user has permission to take and which resources they can access.

- Your registration data and your JuvBand data are maintained separately, and your health data is identified with your registration code, not your name or email.

- JuvYou has a defined incident response process to monitor and report security incidents.

- You must actively check the option of giving separate permission to permit JuvYou to use your aggregated information for research prior to registration to the services.

However, all transmission over the internet carries certain risks and therefore, all users are encouraged to evaluate those risks prior to using our services. We encourage you to practice general internet safety guidelines, such as choosing a strong and unique password for your JuvYou account, changing your password if you suspect it has been compromised, and signing out of your account when you are finished. The JuvYou Privacy Notice can be found here. Please read it carefully before you decide to continue using JuvYou.

What is my JuvBand age?

Your JuvBand age is featured at the top of the Home page in the JuvYou mobile app. JuvBand age is a way of looking at your biological age or how you may be aging physiologically compared to your chronological age (number of birthdays). We express the JuvBand age in years to make this value easy to compare to your chronological age.

Your JuvBand age considers a variety of measures and lifestyle factors. These factors can include chronological age, ethnicity, body measures, blood biomarkers, lifestyle behaviors, and other indicators. The lower your JuvBand age relative to your chronological age means you are taking charge of your wellness journey and we can help you stay on track. If your JuvBand age is higher than your chronological age, it may be time to focus on yourself to improve your wellness. Whatever your JuvBand age, JuvYou can support your wellness with personalized recommendations and tips to live your healthiest life.

How is my JuvBand age calculated?

JuvYou uses a proprietary artificial intelligence algorithm (patent pending) to compare your data to publicly available data sources in order to calculate your JuvBand age.

JuvYou Glossary

What terms help paint a picture of my health?*

2-hour blood sugar

What is it?/Why is it important?

An additional measure of the sugar levels in your blood and indicator of how well our bodies use sugar. If your body cannot use the sugar you eat, buildup can cause damage to your body over time and negatively impact your health.

What is optimal?

Less than 140 mg/dL of blood (7.8 mmol/L)

Where can I find this?

This test (glucose tolerance test [GTT] or oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]) is ordered by your healthcare provider and completed in the office by drawing blood before and up to 2 hours after drinking a sugary beverage. If you completed this test (not everyone does), you should be able to pull this value from your lab results, an electronic medical record, or contact your healthcare provider.

A1C / HbA1c

What is it?/Why is it important?Also known as HbA1c, hemoglobin A1c, or glycosylated/glycated hemoglobin, and a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2 to 3 months. If your body can’t use the sugar you eat, it can stick to the hemoglobin (oxygen carrier) in your red blood cells and cause damage over time, leading to health complications. A1C may help to identify risk when fasting blood sugar is optimal.

What is optimal?
Less than 5.7%

Where can I find this?
This value is part of a blood draw ordered by your healthcare provider. This test is not always part of a typical panel and may need to be requested. If this test was completed, you should be able to pull this value from your lab results, an electronic medical record, or contact your healthcare provider.

Arm circumference

What is it?/Why is it important?
The distance around your mid-upper arm, and if you are normal weight and over 60 years of age, an indicator of risk that your body cannot respond to insulin and use sugar (glucose) in your blood (also known as insulin resistance).

What is optimal?
Men: 32 cm (12.6 in) or less
Women: 29 cm (11.4 in) or less

(For those who are normal weight and over the age of 60)

Blood lipids

What is it?/Why is it important?Refers to the fats (lipids) in your blood and includes cholesterol (HDL and LDL), triglycerides, and a few others, but these are the most common.

What is optimal?
See optimal cholesterol (total, HDL, and LDL) and triglycerides as indicators.

Where can I find this?
These values are part of a blood draw ordered by your healthcare provider, called a lipid profile (or lipid panel). If this test was completed, you should be able to pull this value from your lab results, an electronic medical record, or contact your healthcare provider.

Blood pressure

What is it?/Why is it important?How forcefully blood flows through your blood vessels — if your blood pressure is too high it can negatively impact your cardiovascular health, lead to vision problems, and impact your sexual health.

What is optimal?
Non-Hispanic black: less than 115 mm Hg (upper/first number) over 75 mm Hg (lower/second number), also written as 115/75 mm Hg

All other ethnicities/races: less than 130 mm Hg (upper/first number) over 85 mm Hg (lower/second number), also written as 130/80 mm Hg, and ideally less than 120/80 mm Hg

Where can I find this?
This value was likely measured by your healthcare provider. You should be able to pull this value from your clinic visit summary, an electronic medical record, or contact your healthcare provider. You could also measure this yourself, first thing in the morning or after being seated and resting for at least 5 minutes, if you have an at-home blood pressure monitor.

Body mass index (BMI)

What is it?/Why is it important?
An indicator of body fatness, calculated using your weight in kilograms divided by your height in meters squared, and elevated BMI is an indicator of risk that your body may not respond to insulin and use the glucose in your blood. A high BMI can also negatively impact your cardiovascular health.

What is optimal?
18.5 to 24.9 kg/m (this may not apply to athletes who have higher muscle mass)

Body (re)shaping

What is it?/Why is it important?Improvements in your body composition including your weight, waist, muscle mass, and fat mass.

What is optimal?
See optimal BMI and waist circumference as indicators.

Cardiovascular health

What is it?/Why is it important?Refers to the health of our heart and blood vessels; we can support our cardiovascular health by improving our eating pattern, exercising, avoiding infection, and smoking cessation (if you smoke), which all can limit damage to the heart, often caused by buildup of cholesterol in the arteries.

What is optimal or how do I know I’m off course?
See optimal cholesterol (HDL, LDL, and total) and triglycerides as indicators.

Cardiometabolic health

What is it?/Why is it important?Refers to the health of our heart and our body’s ability to process and use energy from our food; we can support our cardiometabolic health by improving our eating pattern, exercising, avoiding infection, diabetes, excess weight gain, and smoking cessation (if you smoke).

What is optimal or how do I know I’m off course?
See optimal cholesterol (total, LDL, and HDL) and triglycerides as indicators.

Chronological Age

What is it?/Why is it important?
The number of years that have elapsed since your birth and a measure of the passage of time. A much smarter number, your JuvBand Age helps tell more of your story. This information can provide insights into your wellness today and helps you progress on your wellness and healthy aging journey.

What is optimal?
Come as you are, and we will partner with you to help you live your healthiest life, regardless of your chronological age.

Where can I find this?
Your chronological age will be displayed at the top of the Home page, on the left side of your JuvBand graph’s x-axis, in the JuvYou Mobile App.

Fasting blood sugar

What is it?/Why is it important?Also known as fasting blood glucose (or fasting plasma glucose). It is a measure of the sugar levels in your blood, after at least 8 hours without food or caloric beverages, and a marker of your body’s ability to use it. If your body cannot use the sugar you eat, buildup in your blood can cause damage to your body over time and negatively impact your health.

What is optimal?
Less than 100 mg/dL OR 5.6 mmol/L

Where can I find this?
This value is part of a blood draw ordered by your healthcare provider, called a comprehensive metabolic panel. You should be able to pull this value from your lab results, an electronic medical record, or contact your healthcare provider. You could also measure this at home with a glucose monitor.

HDL cholesterol

What is it?/Why is it important?
A type of cholesterol that is considered “good” because it acts as a shuttle to help remove “bad” cholesterol from our bodies.

What is optimal?
Men: greater than 40 mg/dL OR 1.0 mmol/L

Women: greater than 50 mg/dL OR 1.0 mmol/L

Where can I find this?
This value is part of a blood draw ordered by your healthcare provider, called lipid profile (or lipid panel). If this test was completed, you should be able to pull this value from your lab results, an electronic medical record, or contact your healthcare provider.

Insulin resistance

What is it?/Why is it important?
A condition that results from our body building up a tolerance to increased insulin, a hormone that helps control the level of sugar in our blood over time, which leads to our muscle and fat cells becoming less effective at taking up sugar (glucose) in our blood.

What is optimal or how do I know I’m off course?
See optimal levels of fasting blood sugar, A1C, and 2-hour blood sugar as indicators.

JuvBand Age

What is it?/Why is it important?JuvBand age is a way of looking at your biological age or how you may be aging physiologically compared to your chronological age. We express the JuvBand age in years to make this value easy to compare to your chronological age (number of birthdays). Your JuvBand age considers a variety of measures and lifestyle factors. These factors can include chronological age, ethnicity, body measures, blood biomarkers, lifestyle behaviors, and other indicators. We use a patent-pending algorithm that uses artificial intelligence to compare your inputs to thousands of individuals in a large publicly available database, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), to determine your JuvBand age.

What is optimal?
The lower your JuvBand age relative to your chronological age means you are taking charge of your wellness journey and we can help you stay on track. If your JuvBand age is higher than your chronological age, that means it is time to focus on yourself to improve your wellness. Whatever your JuvBand age, JuvYou can support your wellness with personalized recommendations and tips to live your healthiest life.

Where can I find this?
Your JuvBand age is featured at the top of the JuvBand tab in the JuvYou Mobile App.

LDL cholesterol

What is it?/Why is it important?
A type of cholesterol that is considered “bad” as it can build up in our blood vessels and narrow blood flow which over time can raise your risk for heart disease and stroke.

What is optimal?
Less than 100 mg/dL(2.6 mmol/L)

Where can I find this?
This value is part of a blood draw ordered by your healthcare provider, called a lipid profile (or lipid panel). If this test was complete, you should be able to pull this value from your lab results, an electronic medical record, or contact your healthcare provider.

Metabolic health

What is it?/Why is it important?Refers to our body’s ability to process and use energy from our food (metabolism). We can optimize our metabolism by improving our eating patterns, exercising, minimizing stress, and maintaining a healthy weight, which all help maintain our metabolic health.

What is optimal or how do I know I’m off course?
See metabolic syndrome for indicators.

Metabolic syndrome

What is it?/Why is it important?
A condition that includes a group of risk factors that ultimately increases risk of poor cardiometabolic health.

What is optimal or how do I know I’m off course?
See optimal levels of waist, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose as indicators.

Metabolic syndrome means a waist size that is…

Asian (non-Hispanic): Men: 35.4 in (90 cm) or more
Women: 31.5 in (80 cm) or more

All other ethnicities/races: Men: 37 in (94 cm) or more
Women: 31.5 in (80 cm) or more

AND two of the following risk factors:

- Triglycerides: 150 mg/dL (1.7 mmol/L) or higher or treatment for high triglycerides

- HDL cholesterol: less than 40 mg/dL (1.03 mmol/L) for men, less than 50 mg/dL (1.29 mmol/L) for women, or treatment for low HDL

- Blood pressure: 130/85 or higher or treatment for high blood pressure

- Fasting blood sugar: 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) or higher or diagnosis of type 2 diabetes

Prediabetes

What it is?/Why is it important?
A health condition where your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to fall into the category of type 2 diabetes.

What is optimal or how do I know I’m off course?
See optimal levels of fasting blood sugar, A1C, and 2-hour blood sugaras indicators.

Prediabetes means levels of these indicators are in the following ranges:

- A1C: 5.7-6.4%

- Fasting blood sugar: 100-125 mg/dL (5.6-6.9 mmol/L)

- 2-hour blood sugar: 140-199 mg/dL (7.8-11.0 mmol/L)

Respiratory health

What it is?/Why is it important?
We can keep our lungs in tip-top shape by exercising, avoiding infection, limiting exposure to indoor and outdoor pollutants, and smoking cessation (if you smoke).

What is optimal or how do I know I’m off course?
Reach out to your healthcare provider if you have concerns and/or to get more information.

Total cholesterol

What is it?/Why is it important?Blood cholesterol, different from dietary cholesterol which we get in our food, is made by our liver and essential for making hormones and digesting fat but too much cholesterol puts are cardiovascular system at risk — it is good toknow your numbers.

What is optimal?
Less than 200 mg/dL(5.18 mmol/L)

Where can I find this?
This value is part of a blood draw ordered by your healthcare provider, called a lipid profile (or lipid panel). If this test was complete, you should be able to pull this value from your lab results, an electronic medical record, or contact your healthcare provider.

Triglycerides

What is it?/Why is it important?
A type of fat and storage system for when we have more calories (energy) than we need after eating.

What is optimal?
Less than 150 mg/dL(1.7 mmol/L)

Where can I find this?
This value is part of a blood draw ordered by your healthcare provider, called a lipid profile (or lipid panel). If this test was complete, you should be able to pull this value from your lab results, an electronic medical record, or contact your healthcare provider.

Waist circumference

What is it?/Why is it important?
The distance around your waist and an indicator of abdominal fat which has been linked to risk that your body may not respond to insulin (insulin resistance) and use the sugar in your blood. A high waist circumference may also negatively impact your cardiometabolic health.

What is optimal?
Asian (non-Hispanic):
Men: less than 35.4 in (90 cm)
Women: less than 31.5 in (80 cm)

All other ethnicities/races:
Men: less than 37 in (94 cm)
Women: less than 31.5 in (80 cm)

What terms help guide my eating pattern and optimizer recommendations?*

Added sugars

What does this mean?

Sugars that are not naturally present and introduced during processing of a specific food; you can find the quantity of added sugars for a food on the Nutrition Facts label — limit added sugars to <10% of your total calorie intake each day (<50 g for a 2000-calorie eating pattern) to support your wellness journey.

Calorie calculation

What does this mean?

We calculate your daily calorie needs by starting with the calories required to fuel your body while resting (resting energy expenditure). Then, we fine tune your calorie suggestions up and down based on your current physical activity level and your physical activity and weight loss goals, if you have provided them.

Dairy avoider

What does that mean?

Individuals that avoid foods made from or that contain cow’s milk such as dairy milk, yogurt, cheese, foods containing milk or milk-derived ingredients such as whey protein powders, some breakfast cereals, baked goods, and other processed foods

Daily value (DV)

What does this mean?

A reference amount for a particular nutrient that tells us what to consume or not to exceed each day for a 2000 calorie diet; %DV (found on the Nutrition Facts label) is the percentage of the DV for each nutrient in a serving of the food (5% DV or less means the food is low in the nutrient, 10- 19% is a good source, more than 20% is high)

Fiber(s)

What does this mean?

type of carbohydrate (carb) that passes through your gastrointestinal tract because your body cannot digest it; includes soluble (dissolves in water) and insoluble (does not dissolve in water) types which are found in whole grains, legumes, nuts, vegetables, and fruits

Food first

What does this mean?

Our philosophy at JuvYou is to get our nutrients from foods first because of all the benefits (known and unknown) whole foods can provide; if you cannot get enough in your eating pattern (or it is not available), look for a supplement to fill the gap.

Gluten avoider

What does this mean?

Individuals that avoid foods containing gluten (wheat, barley, and rye grains) in their eating pattern

Good source / excellent source

What does this mean?

A food that provides at least 10% of the daily value (DV; noted on the Nutrition Facts label) for a particular nutrient is considered a good source or at least 20% of the DV is considered an excellent source.

Healthy fats

What does this mean?

Unsaturated fats, polyunsaturated (including omega-3’s) and monounsaturated, that we suggest incorporating into your eating pattern in place of saturated fats

Ketogenic diet

What does this mean

high fat eating pattern (70-80% of total calories) with moderate protein (10-20% of total calories) and low carbohydrates (5-10% of total calories or less than 50 grams a day) to promote your body’s production of ketones (ketogenesis)

Ketones

What does this mean?

Compounds made in our bodies during extended fasting or maintenance of a very low carbohydrate eating pattern; these compounds can also be acquired by consuming ketone products.

Legumes

What does this mean?

group of plants that includes beans (chickpea, pinto beans, and black beans, for example), peas, soybeans/edamame, peanuts, and lentils and a source of many important nutrients including plant-based protein and fiber

Lentils

What does this mean?

An edible seed from a legume plant and a source of many important nutrients including plant-based protein and fiber

Low fat

What does this mean?

3 grams (g) or less total fat per serving

Low saturated fat

What does this mean?

1 gram (g) or less saturated fat per serving

Low sodium

What does this mean?

140 milligrams (mg) or less sodium per serving

MCT oil

What does this mean?

A supplement produced from a type of fat called medium chain triglycerides, which may supply building blocks for ketone production in your body

Meal replacement

What does this mean?

A low calorie (200-250 calories) and high protein (25-50% of total calories for the meal) meal idea that is meant to replace one of your meals each day and help you reach your body reshaping and wellness goals

Monounsaturated fat

What does this mean?

A type of healthy unsaturated fat found in foods such as oils that are liquid at room temperature, avocados, nuts, olives, and some fish that our bodies use for energy, to absorb nutrients, and for cell growth

Net carbs

What does this mean?

A value that indicates the carbohydrates (carbs) in a particular food that your body absorbs and will affect your blood sugar levels — calculated by subtracting the grams (g) of “Dietary Fiber” from the grams of “Total Carbohydrate” reported on the Nutrition Facts label for a serving of food

Non-dairy alternatives

What does this mean?

Food products produced from plants (such as soy, almond, cashew, pea protein, coconut, rice, hemp, oat, and flax) that provide food choices to accommodate eating styles that avoid dairy

Omega-3’s

What does this mean?

A type of polyunsaturated fat used for energy and cell messaging and framework that we must get in our food because our body cannot make it. Omega-3’s include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) — EPA and DHA are found in fish, seaweed, and algae, and ALA can be found in some plant oils, nuts, and seeds.

Optimizers

What does this mean?

Nutrient callouts and health tips that will help to optimize your wellness journey, chosen based on the information you provided in your profile, and including a few nutrients that most of us do not get enough of

Plant oils

What does this mean?

Oils produced from plants such as almond, coconut, flax seed, avocado, soybean, olive, corn, sunflower, sesame, and walnut

Plant proteins

What does this mean?

Proteins produced or consumed in plant foods such as legumes, lentils, nuts, and seeds

Polyunsaturated fat

What does this mean?

A type of healthy unsaturated fat and found in foods such as oils that are liquid at room temperature, avocados, nuts, olives, and some fish that our bodies use for energy, to absorb nutrients, and for cell growth

Power proteins

What does this mean?

Food or recipes that have combinations of foods with at least 6 grams of protein per serving such as legumes, nuts, seeds, fish, seafood, eggs, lean meat, dairy, and non-dairy alternatives

Quality carbs

What does this mean?

Foods from a variety of sources such as whole grains, vegetables, and fruits that have most of their calories as carbohydrates (carbs) and supply fiber and other important nutrients

Recommended dietary allowance (RDA)

What does this mean?

The intake level of a particular nutrient that will meet the daily requirements for most (97-98%) individuals

Refined carbohydrates / grains

What does this mean?

Carbohydrate (carb) sources stripped of important nutrients as a result of processing such as sugary foods/beverages and white: flours, breads, pastas, and rice — focus your carb intake on whole grains, vegetables, and fruits

Seitan

What does this mean?

A plant protein source made from wheat and popular vegan protein source with an appearance and texture similar to meat when cooked

Serving size

What does this mean?

The amount of food that corresponds to the calories and nutrient values declared on the Nutrition Facts label and not necessarily how much should be consumed

Time-restricted eating

What does this mean?

A type of intermittent fasting where you eat your meals within a certain time frame, for example, 10 am to 6 pm, and fast (no calorie-containing food or beverages) the remaining hours of the day

Unsaturated fats

What does this mean?

Fats that are liquid at room temperature including monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats and predominantly found in plants

Vitals

What does this mean?

Foods chosen for you based on your unique profile, preferences, and nutrients lacking in typical eating patterns, that we suggest you add to your eating routine to help you achieve optimal health

What terms help guide my activity recommendations?*

Balance

What does this mean?

Activity directed at improving our ability to control our body while standing such as tai chi, yoga, and movements with a balance trainer or stability ball

Barre

What does this mean?

type of physical activity that focuses on core strength, flexibility, stability, and mobility, utilizing a ballet barre (or equivalent like a countertop or chair back) for standing/floor efforts

Cardio activity

What does this mean?

Also called aerobic or cardiorespiratory activity (running and cycling, for example) which increases your breathing and heart rate; requiring cardiorespiratory endurance — the ability of your heart and lungs to get oxygen to your muscles during continuous activity

Endurance

What does this mean?

The ability to perform activity over an extended period of time

Flexibility

What does this mean?

The ability to move our joints in a full range of motion to release muscle tension which may reduce risk of injuries

High intensity interval training (HIIT)

What does this mean?

type of physical activity that incorporates repeated intervals of vigorous intensity training followed by active recovery periods at moderate intensity

Moderate intensity

What does this mean?

level of activity where you will break a sweat and raise your heart rate, while still being able to hold a conversation or sing — your intensity rating, on a scale of 0 (sitting) to 10 (maximum effort), should be a 5-6.

Neuromotor activity

What does this mean?

Also known as functional training; activity directed at improving the quality of movement by motor skills training including balance, coordination, gait, agility, and proprioception (see additional terms definitions for more information)

Pilates

What does this mean?

type of physical activity that incorporates flexibility and strength training

Proprioception

What does this mean?

The sense that makes us aware of our body position and orientation as well as body and limb motion

Strength activity

What does this mean?

Also called strength training or resistance training is activity that incorporates resistance to muscular contraction to increase strength, endurance, and muscle size using body weight, machines, weights, resistance bands, kettlebells, or even household items such as gallon containers filled with water

Tabata

What does this mean?

type of high intensity interval training (HIIT) that incorporates both cardio and strength activity; your efforts are at vigorous intensity and double the time of your recovery (20-second effort followed by 10 seconds recovery, for example), four minutes of 2:1 effort: recovery is one round, complete four rounds separated by one-minute breaks

Vigorous intensity

What does this mean?

level of activity where you will breathe hard and fast, making it difficult to say more than a few words at a time — your intensity rating on a scale of 0 (sitting) to 10 (maximum effort) should be a 7-8.

Yoga - Hatha / Vinyasa

What does this mean?

type of physical activity that focuses on the power of breathing to connect the mind and body with movement

CONCLUSION

Becoming familiar with all the terms that paint your health picture will help empower your mission to achieve and maintain wellness.

*The JuvYou Mobile App does not provide medical advice and is not meant to treat or prevent disease or replace a visit to your healthcare provider. You should not rely on it solely to make important medical decisions.